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Author Topic: 1959 CC-925 restomod  (Read 43604 times)

kblackav8or

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1959 CC-925 restomod
« on: January 10, 2012, 09:31:06 PM »
Starting a new thread.  Other then some non essential wiring and things like a tach cable and speedo, the engine swap is complete.  Worked through a dumb mistake on my part in not realizing their was supposed to be a spacer plate installed between the starter and bellhousing.  It was missing and the gear reduction starter I initially had seemed to fit fine.  Turns out I probably ruined that starter by not having the spacer and figured it out only after the new starter made some awful noises.  That is all fixed now and it is back to being fully roadworthy.  Took it for a spin today after I resolved the starter mess.  Mostly good weather, a little overcast at times.  Videos going up on my youtube page as I type this.

So bought it in November of 2010.  Winter/Spring replaced front axle with one that had air disk brakes.  Replumbed a good portion of the truck and replaced the foot valve and some other stuff to make them work. 

Worked on cleaning out the old carpet and interior. 

Added another fuel tank to match the one on the drivers side.

Started to prep for the engine swap.  Worked on replacement engine and got it running.  Swapped in the engine in late October.  Spent 2 weeks in November on peripherals.  December got the rest of the peripherals done and ready for road test. 

Next stage is body, interior, wiring, paint.  That should finish it for my purposes.  They are never really done but that will be 90% or better. 

Planning on cab and hood bodywork along with wiring and dash paint being the next projects to take on. 
Videos today
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iyhJHcTFVdA&hd=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeH3S8qvJ08&hd=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHuPoxZwTeA&hd=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGISGMald1I&hd=1
« Last Edit: January 10, 2012, 09:38:43 PM by kblackav8or »

kblackav8or

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2012, 10:16:20 PM »
Had the body guy look at it.  Outside my budget to do all the work.  Might be able to have him do final shooting and finish work.  Started to do a bit of it myself but need some filler before I can really get going.  That will happen next week.  I should have the hood prepped in a few days after I get a roll of sand paper and remove the grill trim.  I don't think it will take very long to do it only has a few scratches and maybe some checking to deal with.  Roof has a lot of little dings to deal with and some extra holes and I need to realign the marker lights so that is more holes to deal with.  Putting bigger horns on the roof will make it look more normal as a highway truck instead of the sides of the cab.  I have bullet lights for it too.  With luck the paint will be done and the sleeper on by August.  I have no idea if my schedule will allow any shows this year or not.  Brooks is one I am hoping for or a fall show with one of the WA chapters.  My Chapter has expressed interest in a Poker run and filming it ala Tombstone Run.  We have WA HWY 20 going through the North Cascades that is pretty breathtaking in spots and would be perfect.  They want to poker run out, camp over night and then run back.  Not sure where the planning stands on that.  At any rate my projects are moving along albeit not real fast but making progress. 

kblackav8or

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2012, 09:03:50 PM »
In the past few days when the weather has permitted I have started to do bodywork.  Filled some drilled holes in the fiberglass of the hood and exposing holes in the roof cap.  I wish I had a helper and a fresh roof cap and sides to put on and not have to pay for it but that aint happening so I will fix up what I got.  The roof has a lot of little dents, all filled with bondo.  They didn't bother trying to bang out the dent ahead of time.  A lot of them are easily accessible with the headliner out.  Unfortunately it ends up being a 2 person job.  My intent is to knock as many out as much as possible.  Patch and fill the holes with some metal epoxy and aluminum and get it as good as it can be, then refill what is left prime and go.  Mostly the rest is dealing with the rivets.  A bunch have been replaced with cherry or pop type rivets.  Some have been sanded down.  I bought myself a little speedy blaster and a bag of glass bead.  That thing while small and needing frequent refills is pretty darn useful.  I have mostly been DA sanding the paint off with 80 grit but the rivets and some areas are better done with the blaster.  The truck will be painted the same blue and white as my car.  Should really pop nicely







John Hanson

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2012, 12:32:07 AM »
Kevin, I've always had good luck shrinking dents, especially in aluminum, with a small butane torch and ice cubes... they only need to go to about 350 degrees and then hit them with the ice.. sometimes you need to persuade them just a bit with slapper and dolly before and after heat, but it usually makes a bit less work out of it.
JH

kblackav8or

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2012, 12:21:48 PM »
Heat and aluminum in the past has scared me but that sounds pretty interesting.  John can you elaborate on the technique?  I have a shrinking hammer too and dolly's but if I can get halfway there or better with heat and cold that sounds good.  I am thinking I am moving my rebuild blog over here instead of on the ATHS site due to the recent takeover. 

Bullistik8v92

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2012, 04:15:39 PM »
Kevin,
I'd suggest picking up a few scrap pieces of aluminum similar in gauge to the roof of your truck to practice on. The heat/cool cycle to shrink the aluminum works well, but if done incorrectly it'll turn that patch of aluminum into a wash board and just make that much more hammer work for you. Try it on some scrap pieces until you get a bit of a feel for it!

As a basecoat filler you might consider a USC product called Duraglass. Its a fiberglass reinforced filler that bonds like epoxy, it's some seriously tuff stuff! It needs to be skimmed with something that sand nicer for a top coat, but it's good stuff.

Recent takeover? What did I miss?

kblackav8or

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2012, 04:28:22 PM »
I have been using some Duraglass on the hood so moving to the roof shouldn't be a problem.  Is there any hammering involved in the heating cooling shrinking technique or is it heat a little, quench, repeat? 

John Hanson

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2012, 04:47:59 PM »
Kevin, use a small propane torch, that way you most likely wont get it too hot. Anything other than that, and you can create alot of problems by overheating or burning through.  I take it up to temp, then as soon as you can, stick an ice cube on it. I used to take dixie cups and fill them and freeze them, that way I could have a nice big cube that i could hang onto, without it being too big. The thing that does the most good is the quickness of the ice after the flame. Use 2 people if you can. I've pulled out some pretty good dents in panels and cowls by working the center, then the edges, then back to the center and work out. Don't be afraid to cycle it more than once.
As for fillers, I've found that some of the aluminum based fillers are much better on something like your roof, especially if it's going to be painted dark. The main thing is to get the dent very well scratched, and then very clean... adhesion is your friend.

kblackav8or

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2012, 04:58:22 PM »
Great - sounds like I need to make up some ice.  If there is still filler in part of the dent, do I need to clean that our first or let it just pop out?  I have most of it out but there is some residue that will take some more significant grinding. 

Bullistik8v92

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2012, 06:59:43 PM »
A little filler left won't hurt anything if it's a few spots left in old sanding ridges or tiny dent, it'll just pop out or burn up. If there is a lot left sand it out more.

Aluminum can be tricky for temperature as there isn't a huge visual change like in most steels. A propane torch is pretty safe, you can also get some heat markers at most decent welding supply stores. They come in a wide array of temperatures. They're handy for a definite and quick assessment of temperature.

kblackav8or

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2012, 08:21:32 PM »
Todays work.  More sanding and stripping.  I am trying to decide between single stage paint and 2 stage base/clear.  I have shot base clear before but don't know what to do to fix boo-boo's later.  With single stage it would look more original and be more easily touched up later.  I am uncovering some past paint schemes that some may be able to see in the pictures.  They aren't super obvious but there is black and gold and red and a turqoise color along with layers of primer and purple.  You can also see how much of my roof is filled. 




























bobbyron

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2012, 09:52:22 PM »
use paint remover and get all that old paint off the cab. on the fiberglass don't use will eat the jel-coate.

Bullistik8v92

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2012, 02:36:51 AM »
I prefer base clear, its easier to fix most screw ups and its easier to repair if something happens down the road (dent, etc.). But it's an extra step. If you are using more than one color I like having all the colors under the clear. There is nothing wrong with single stage and is still a good choice.

Making good progress. Looks like you had decent weather up there, a lot dryer than around here!!

kblackav8or

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2012, 11:12:18 AM »
I need to learn the trick on fixing base clear then.  I.E. how to get the clear off to re-shoot some base, blending and other tricks.  One of the reasons I am hesitant to use base/clear is that it ends up not looking very authentic i.e. too deep and glossy.  That being said the stuff is a lot tougher and if you do a good job on both once it is dry there is minimal color sanding.  The weather has been off and on.  Last couple days rainy/windy but then I get lucky and a few hours of dry sunny in the afternoon.  Yesterday same deal except didn't rain in the morning.   

John Hanson

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Re: 1959 CC-925 restomod
« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2012, 04:53:42 PM »
I like base/clear too... way easier to fix. No real "trick" to it.... just don't figure you're going to tear in there with the DA and fix it...use a block and sand it down...no biggie. I'd say get all that crap off the roof and cab too, as well as the hood. It's just gonna come to haunt you in the end. I use stripper on all of it...there's some slower acting stripper that can be used easily on fiberglas as well. As far as "gelcoat"..that's nothing to worry about. If it goes away, just use some featherfill (which I'd suggest a couple of coats of anyway) to give you a good base to block it out. Gelcoat is actually just to keep the bare glas and resin from the UV, and give it a nice smooth finish that's easier to get out of a mold. You'll probably get plenty of UV protection anyway, especially if you use polyurethane paint (it's got quite a bit of UV block in it by nature).
The thing to remember is that the rest of the job is only as good as the foundation... so not going all the way down and blocking is going to show up down the road.